The Alzheimer Scotland Student Research Programme is excited to announce our first ever MRes student: Kelly Kelly. Kelly’s studentship is hosted by the Alzheimer Scotland Centre for Policy and Practice at the University of the West of Scotland. She is supervised by Dr Anna Jack-Waugh and Dr Eileen Harkess-Murphy.

Kelly already has extensive experience working with people with dementia and is passionate about enhancing the quality of life for individuals with dementia and their caregivers. She is a registered mental health nurse specialising in dementia care and has a BA (Hons) in Psychology.

For this specific MRes project, Kelly’s research will focus on the gap in knowledge around the use of trauma-informed approaches within dementia care, with emphasis on the experience of people with young onset dementia.  This research is important because people with young onset dementia experience a greater time on a diagnosis pathway than people with late-onset dementia. This can lead to a greater risk of harm associated with the psychological distress of a diagnosis that may cause trauma. Therefore, the outcomes of this research will help allow for a trauma-informed interpretation of the process and the patient/family perspective, which will improve the diagnosis pathway for people with young onset dementia.

Kelly’s project has recently started/ Talking about the Studentship, she said

“I am delighted to be part of The Alzheimer Scotland Student Research Programme hosted by the Alzheimer Scotland Centre for Policy and Practice at the University of the West of Scotland. I am looking forward to contributing to this innovative research and continuing my nursing career dedicated to dementia care.”

Project supervisor, Anna, added:

“Eileen Harkess-Murphy and I are delighted to be supported by Alzheimer Scotland to develop this first MRes studentship.  Our candidate, Kelly, has an excellent background, and clear support from the Active Voices Network. This will enable her to explore the potential for a trauma-informed diagnostic approach to the diagnosis of Young Onset Dementia.”

Kelly is enthusiastic about advancing her research initiatives in this field, aiming to make a meaningful impact on individuals affected by dementia. Alzheimer Scotland and the SDRC look forward to working with Kelly and the rest of the team at the Alzheimer Scotland Centre for Policy and Practice (ASCPP) throughout this MRes project. We will make sure to keep SDRC members updated on Kelly’s research project as it progresses.

In the meantime, please make sure to follow Kelly on Twitter: https://twitter.com/kellykresearch

and the ASCPP:  https://twitter.com/AlzScotCPP

The Alzheimer Student Research Programme support the next generation of dementia and brain health research by funding studentships at institutions across Scotland. Find out more here

Read more SDRC Blogs

Early Career Researchers: Juan Varela

This week, the SDRC are publishing a series of blogs to PhD Students/ Early Career Researchers that were featured in the SDRC Annual Report 2019/20. Today's blog is from Juan Varela from the University of St Andrews  My academic background is a mixture of physics,...

Guest Blog: Rachel Allen

Today's blog is from Rachel Allen, a PhD candidate form the Alzheimer Scotland Centre for Policy and Practice at the University of the West of Scotland. Rachel talks about the PhD journey and the process of research. My name is Rachel Allen, and I am in my second year...

Confident Conversations for Research Participation

Confident Conversations is a collaboration between the Neuroprogressive and Dementia Network (NDN) and Alzheimer Scotland. It is a forward-thinking initiative to assist in enabling everyone with dementia to be offered the opportunity to participate in research. This...

Do you have insights to share with other researchers? Write a blog for the SDRC!

We are always looking for SDRC members to feature on our website and write a guest blog for the SDRC. You may already be familiar with our blog series, where we welcome contributions from people with an experience of brain health or dementia research. Blogs are an...

Early Career Researchers: Kenneth Davidson

Over the last few weeks, the SDRC have been delighted to share blogs from dementia research PhD students and early career researchers. Read the series so far here  This blog is by Kenneth Davidson, who is a staff nurse at NHS Lothian and a PhD student at the...

Early Career Researchers: Jennifer Waymont

Recently as part of the launch of the SDRC Annual Report 2019/20, we have been sharing the work early career researchers by publishing a series of blogs from the ECRs that feature in the report. Today, we are featuring Jennifer Waymont, a PhD student from the...

SDRC Annual Report 2022/23: Informatics & Technology

The following is an excerpt of SDRC Annual Report 2022/23 which provides on overview of the research in the field of brain health Informatics & Technology, written by theme lead and SDRC Executive Committee member Dr Mario Parra Rodriguez. Summary of the theme The...

Tips for researchers during Covid-19- Advice from Dr Terry Quinn for Principal Investigators

We will soon be starting a series on the SDRC Blog from Principal Investigators, sharing their experiences of research over the past few months. Today, we have another blog from Dr Terry Quinn at the University of Glasgow. Terry is sharing tips for researchers during...

COVID Impact on ECRs: Miriam Scarpa

In the coming days, the SDRC are publishing a series of blogs featuring Early Career Researchers who are sharing how COVID has impacted their research and career prospects. The first blogs in this series also featured in our COVID Research Impact Report which we...

SDRC Annual Report 2021/22: Informatics & Technology

The following is an excerpt of SDRC Annual Report 2021/22 which provides on overview of the research in the field of brain health Informatics & Technology, written by theme lead and SDRC Executive Committee member Dr Mario Parra Rodriguez. The SDRC is witnessing a...